Broadcast Licencing Scenarios

To help you work out what type of licence you might need, we've provided some possible broadcasting scenario's.

Licence type scenarios

To help you work out what type of licence you might need, we've provided some possible broadcasting scenarios below.

Scenario 1

I’m a college student and I want to broadcast music and information to students at our campus. I think I might need a licence, but I'm not sure what type I need or how I'd go about applying for one.

You'll need a General User Radio Licence (GURL) for Low Power FM Broadcasting.

Scenario 2

I want to start my own radio station to broadcast music and content that are different to other radio stations in our area. I think I might need a licence, but I’m not sure what type I need or how I’d go about applying for one.

You'll need a Commercial FM sound broadcasting licence.

Scenario 3

I want to be a broadcaster, but there's no FM frequencies available in my area. The programme content would be a talk show so I don't need the high fidelity of an FM signal.

You'll need a Commercial AM sound broadcasting licence.

Scenario 4

I want to start my own television station to broadcast TV programmes to an audience. I think I might need a licence, but I’m not sure what type I need or how I’d go about applying for one.

You'll need a Television broadcasting licence.

Scenario 5

We're a community-based organisation that doesn't have a lots of resources, but we want to start our own radio station to provide information and local program content to our general community. We're willing to share airtime with other community-based groups. I think I might need a licence, but I’m not sure what type I need or how I’d go about applying for one.

You'll need a Non-commercial AM or FM sound broadcasting licence.

Scenario 6

I work for an iwi organisation that wants to start its own radio station to promote Māori language and culture. I think I might need a licence, but I’m not sure what type I need or how I’d go about applying for one.

You'll need a Māori reserved sound broadcasting licence.

Obligations under the Broadcasting Act 1989

If you obtain a license and become a broadcaster as defined under the Broadcasting Act 1989, you have obligations under the broadcasting standards regime, which is overseen by the Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA). The BSA’s website contains a summary of the key requirements for broadcasters, accessed from the link below. Once your license is granted, please provide your details to BSA by email at info@bsa.govt.nz

Overview of Obligations for Broadcasters(external link)

Broadcasting Act 1989(external link)