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Ultra Wide Band General User Radio Licence changes 2015

Radio Spectrum Management (RSM) currently authorises the operation of Ultra Wide Band (UWB) communication devices via a General User Radio Licence (GURL). 

A frequency range, broadly between 1 and 10 GHz, is authorised although the power level and conditions of use vary throughout the range to improve compatibility with existing licenced services. For devices implemented with mitigation techniques – typically through low duty cycle (LDC)1 mode of operation, a set of less stringent rules within the operational frequency range from 3.4 to 4.8 GHz currently applies.

The GURL when originally granted was harmonised with the parameters of the applicable regulations in Europe (EU). It is noted that EU have subsequently changed its UWB regulations in December 20112. Therefore, the GURL for UWB operation in New Zealand is now not consistent with regulations in the EU or other major markets which manufacture products utilising UWB techniques.

RSM has recently reviewed the UWB GURL, in particular the conditions applicable to the frequency range from 3.1 GHz to 3.4 GHz. As a result of this review, UWB devices implemented with LDC mode will be permitted to operate at a less stringent peak power and mean power spectral density limits within 3.1 – 4.8 GHz. The expansion to sub-band 3.1 – 3.4 GHz enables harmonisation with the EU generic rules for UWB operation.

The current users of the 3.1 – 3.4 GHz band, including short range devices and amateur radios, operate under general user licenses that require them to accept interference from other services.

The following updated GURL for UWB devices came into force on the 15 December 2014.

 

Frequency range

Maximum mean e.i.r.p. spectral density (dBm/MHz)

Maximum peak e.i.r.p. (measured in 50 MHz)


Below 1.6 GHz

-90 dBm/MHz

-50 dBm

1.6 to 2.7 GHz

-85 dBm/MHz

-45 dBm

2.7 to 3.4 GHz

(Note 1)

 -70 dBm/MHz

-36 dBm

3.4 to 3.8 GHz (Note 1)

-80 dBm/MHz

 -40 dBm

3.8 to 4.2 GHz
(Note 1)

-70 dBm/MHz

-30 dBm

4.2 to 4.8 GHz
(Notes 1 and 2)

-70 dBm/MHz

-30 dBm

4.8 to 6 GHz

-70 dBm/MHz

-30 dBm

6 to 8.5 GHz
(Note 2)

-41.3 dBm/MHz

 0 dBm

8.5 to 10.6 GHz

-65 dBm/MHz

-25 dBm

Above 10.6 GHz

-85 dBm/MHz

 

-45 dBm



Definitions:

Note 1: Within the band of 3.1 – 4.8 GHz, if low duty cycle (LDC) is implemented, devices may operate at:

  1. a maximum mean e.i.r.p spectral density of -41.3 dBm/MHz; and
  2. a maximum peak e.i.r.p of 0 dBm.


Note 2
: Road & Rail vehicles.
1. For devices installed in road and rail vehicles, where transmit power control is implemented:

  1. the maximum mean e.i.r.p. spectral density is -41.3 dBm/MHz.
  2. the maximum peak e.i.r.p is 0 dBm.
  3. the transmit power control must operate with a range of 12 dB below the maximum mean e.i.r.p spectral density.

2. For devices installed in road and rail vehicles, where transmit power control is not implemented:

  1. the maximum mean e.i.r.p. spectral density is -53.3 dBm/MHz; and
  2. the maximum peak e.i.r.p is -12 dBm.

 

Comparison of current and proposed changes
 

Ultra Wide Band General User Radio Licence changes 2014 - comparison chart


Footnotes

1Other mitigation techniques such as decision directed autocorrect (DDA) for UWB devices are authorised overseas but not in New Zealand
2Refer to ECC Decision (06) 04, as amended on 9 December 2011, The harmonised conditions for devices using
Ultra-Wideband (UWB) technology in bands below 10.6 GHz

 


 

Last updated 10 August 2016